Genealogy Gems: News from the Fort Wayne Library, No. 44, October 30, 2007
From: Genealogy Gems (genealogygemsgenealogycenter.info)
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 19:30:16 -0700 (PDT)
Genealogy Gems:  News from the Fort Wayne Library
No. 44, October 30, 2007

In this issue:
*Looking into Late Autumn
*Early Families of Southern Maryland
*Using Regional City Newspaper Sources
*Preservation Tip of the Month
*Librarians on Tour
*Area Calendar of Events
*Driving Directions to the Library
*Parking at the Library
*Queries for the Department

***************************************
Looking into Late Autumn
by Curt B. Witcher
***************************************
With another Family History Month successfully concluding, I truly
hope you can say that you spent at least a little extra time this
month engaging in family history activities.  I have always thought it
appropriate that Family History Month falls just before the annual
holiday rush.  It can serve as a bit of a wake-up call for us in
preparing for the holidays.  Yes, there is the great feast to prepare
for the Thanksgiving dinner table and further, there are all those
presents to acquire and distribute.  But when you stop to think about
the heart of the holidays, it is typically there that you find family.
 And where you find family, you find fantastic opportunities to share
stories, documents, and photographs about ancestors and days gone by.

In the last two years, November has been designated "Family Health
History Month" with Thanksgiving Day being proclaimed "Family Health
History Day."  While I have not seen much publicity on this in 2007, I
believe it is still quite worthwhile to take some time in November to
specifically focus on your health history.  The U.S. Surgeon General
has created a "My Family Health Portrait" website at
<https://familyhistory.hhs.gov/>. Getting started couldn't get much
easier.

A brand new orientation video to the Genealogy Center is available
24-7 on the web at <www.GenealogyCenter.info/video>.  This orientation
video is in QuickTime format.  If you do not have this free player,
you can download it from http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/.  It
runs best on a high-speed or broadband connection and is just under
twenty minutes long.  The video is a great way to get familiar with
the Center if you haven't been here in a while.  It does a good job of
warming the place up and helping you formulate questions specific to
your research.  The video can also be found in two parts on YouTube if
that is more convenient for your viewing.

Now more than ever, this library is the place to come to find our
where you're from!

***************************************
Early Families of Southern Maryland
by Mary D. Kraeszig
***************************************
In 1992, Elise Greenup Jourdan published the first installment of a
ten volume set of early southern Maryland genealogies; the last volume
was published in 2001. Each book is a gem focused on approximately
10-20 families who settled in one or more of Maryland's southern
counties: St. Mary's, Charles, Prince George's, Calvert, and Anne
Arundel, with some families extending west or north into Frederick,
Talbot, and Baltimore Counties. The southern counties of this state
were populated early in its history, beginning with the first English
settlement in St. Mary's county in 1634.

Families are arranged using an easily understood modification of the
Henry numbering system. Facts about individuals are carefully
documented, and known controversies or ambiguities are noted and
analyzed. Abstracts of wills and land records are provided with clear
citations. When errata or further information came to light after the
original publication of a volume, this information was added to the
next volume under "Corrections and Additions" near the end of the
book. Finally, each volume contains a table of contents and a complete
index of both personal names and property names. (Tracts of land in
Maryland were named, such as "Green's Inheritance" or "Cross Manor,"
which makes land records there easier to research than in many
states.)

This ten volume set is a valuable research aid to genealogists with
ancestors in southern Maryland during the colonial and early federal
period. Jourdan's research is careful and thorough, and these works
are highly readable and easy to follow. The only element lacking is a
single master index for the complete series. The Genealogy Center has
the full set in its collection (call number 975.2 J82e), with each
volume individually bound. "Early Families of Southern Maryland" is an
excellent example of the Genealogy Center's strong collection of
Maryland sources, and also one of twelve titles in the collection
written by Elise Greenup Jourdan.

***************************************
Using Regional City Newspaper Sources
by Delia Cothrun Bourne
***************************************
We as genealogists too often limit our research to the specific area
in which an ancestor lived, ignoring possible sources in neighboring
communities or the area "big city." This is never truer than with
newspaper reports. Events in the lives of former residents, the
relatives of residents, and other persons of interest are often noted
in local newspapers. An excellent, if comparatively recent, example of
this is the set "Tri-State Obituaries/Index to Tri-State Obituaries
(Indiana-Ohio-Michigan)" (977 T73) that was compiled and printed by
the Allen County Public Library and its forerunners. Although it only
covers the years 1964 through 1984, the area covered is amazing, from
Antwerp, Delphos and Hicksville, Ohio, and Coldwater and Sturgis,
Michigan, to Ligonier, Warsaw and Bluffton in Indiana.

The information is in two distinct formats. The first abstracts
newspaper obituaries from various communities, presenting them in
alphabetical order for the years 1964 to 1969 and for 1970 to 1974.
The second format consists of annual or bi-annual volumes of "Fort
Wayne Journal Gazette" obituary citations for 1975 through 1984.

The vast amount of information included in the obituaries, as
evidenced by the abstract volumes, is amazing, providing locations and
family connections, as well as biographical information. According to
the "Fort Wayne Journal Gazette" of 26 May 1968, James H. Woods of
Bronson, Michigan, died in Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne, was taken
to the Shoup Funeral Home in Howe, Indiana, and his services were at
Lockwood Community Church in Coldwater, Michigan. The "Payne
Reflector" of 7 January 1965 reported that George Schaeffer died in
the Neblett Hospital, in Canyon, Texas after having "resided southwest
of Payne 40 years ago. After leaving here and moving to Texas, he
owned a number of ranches and was known as a writer." Eleanore (Mrs.
Robert) Emig's obituary in the 27 March 1973 edition of the Columbia
City newspaper indicated that although she lived in Battle Creek,
Michigan, she was a daughter-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Emig of
Columbia City.

The bi-annual volume covering 1975 to 1976 indexes both Fort Wayne
newspapers, but the annual volumes, 1977 to 1984, only index those
obituaries that appeared in the "Fort Wayne Journal Gazette." These
indexes provide name, date of the obituary, page number and city of
residence, including among many other towns Warsaw, Indiana, Sturgis,
Michigan, and Celina, Ohio.

Even if you do not have relatives who died in the general Fort Wayne
area, remember that newspapers from other regional cities may also
supply the same type of information for their geographic area.

***************************************
Preservation Tip of the Month
by Becky Schipper
***************************************
The Library of Congress has a great webpage offering simple
instructions and links to more in-depth information regarding
preserving family documents.  The webpage is titled, "Preparing,
Protecting and Preserving Family Treasures."  It is an enjoyable and
informative collection of data and links to explore.  The web address
is: www.lcweb.loc.gov/preserv/familytreasures/index.html

***************************************
Area Calendar of Events
***************************************
Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana (ACGSI)
++Nov. 14, 2007 at 6:30 pm at the Allen County Public Library's Main
Library, 900 Library Plaza, Fort Wayne.  John Hannigan will speak
about 21st Century military veterans of Allen County and an effort to
record them.
++Dec. 12, 2007 at 6:30 p.m. at the Allen County Public Library's Main
Library, 900 Library Plaza.
Members will show and tell about their oldest heirloom or artifact.
Bring yours to share.

Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) "First Wednesday" program
of lineage assistance is Wednesday, November 7th 9 am – 7 pm.  Expert
help from members of the DAR on becoming a member of that
organization.

***************************************
Driving Directions to the Library
***************************************
Wondering how to get to the library?  Our location is 900 Library
Plaza, Fort Wayne, Indiana, in the block bordered on the south by
Washington Boulevard, the west by Ewing Street, the north by Wayne
Street, and the east by the Library Plaza, formerly Webster Street.
We would enjoy having you visit the Genealogy Center.

To get directions from your exact location to 900 Library Plaza, Fort
Wayne, Indiana, visit this link at MapQuest:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&addtohistory=&address=900%20Webster%20St&city=Fort%20Wayne&state=IN&zipcode=46802%2d3602&country=US&geodiff=1

>From the South
Exit Interstate 69 at exit 102.  Drive east on Jefferson Boulevard
into downtown. Turn left on Ewing Street. The Library is one block
north, at Ewing Street and Washington Boulevard.

Using US 27:
US 27 turns into Lafayette Street. Drive north into downtown. Turn
left at Washington Boulevard and go five blocks. The Library will be
on the right.

>From the North
Exit Interstate 69 at exit 112.  Drive south on Coldwater Road, which
merges into Clinton Street.  Continue south on Clinton to Washington
Boulevard. Turn right on Washington and go three blocks. The Library
will be on the right.

>From the West
Using US 30:
Drive into town on US 30.  US 30 turns into Goshen Ave. which
dead-ends at West State Blvd.  Make an angled left turn onto West
State Blvd.  Turn right on Wells Street.  Go south on Wells to Wayne
Street.  Turn left on Wayne Street.  The Library will be in the second
block on the right.

Using US 24:
After crossing under Interstate 69, follow the same directions as from
the South.

>From the East
Follow US 30/then 930 into and through New Haven, under an overpass
into downtown Fort Wayne.  You will be on Washington Blvd. when you
get into downtown.  Library Plaza will be on the right.

***************************************
Parking at the Library
***************************************
At the Library, underground parking can be accessed from Wayne Street.
Other library parking lots are at Washington and Webster, and Wayne
and Webster. Hourly parking is $1 per hour with a $7 maximum. ACPL
library card holders may use their cards to validate the parking
ticket at the west end of the Great Hall of the Library. Out of county
residents may purchase a subscription card with proof of
identification and residence. The current fee for an Individual
Subscription Card is $70.

Public lots are located at the corner of Ewing and Wayne Streets ($1
each for the first two half-hours, $1 per hour after, with a $4 per
day maximum) and the corner of Jefferson Boulevard and Harrison Street
($3 per day).

Street (metered) parking on Ewing and Wayne Streets. On the street you
plug the meters 8am – 5pm, weekdays only.  It is free to park on the
street after 5pm and on the weekends.

Visitor center/Grand Wayne Center garage at Washington and Clinton
Streets. This is the Hilton Hotel parking lot that also serves as a
day parking garage.  For hourly parking, 7am – 11 pm, charges are .50
for the first 45 minutes, then $1.00 per hour.  There is a flat $2.00
fee between 5pm and 11pm.

***************************************
Genealogy Center Queries
***************************************
The Genealogy Center hopes you find this newsletter interesting.
Thank you for subscribing.  We cannot, however, answer personal
research emails written to the e-zine address.  The department houses
a Research Center that makes photocopies and conducts research for a
fee.

If you have a general question about our collection, or are interested
in the Research Center, please telephone the library and speak to a
librarian who will be glad to answer your general questions or send
you a research center form.  Our telephone number is 260-421-1225.  If
you'd like to email a general information question about the
department, please email: Genealogy [at] ACPL.Info.

***************************************
Publishing Note:
***************************************
This electronic newsletter is published by the Allen County Public
Library's Genealogy Center, and is intended to enlighten readers about
genealogical research methods as well as inform them about the vast
resources of the Allen County Public Library.  We welcome the wide
distribution of this newsletter and encourage readers to forward it to
their friends and societies.  All precautions have been made to avoid
errors.  However, the publisher does not assume any liability to any
party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions, no matter
the cause.

To subscribe to "Genealogy Gems," simply use your browser to go to the
website:  www.GenealogyCenter.Info. Scroll down toward the bottom of
the first screen where it says, "Enter Your Email Address to Subscribe
to "Genealogy Gems."  Enter your email address in the yellow box and
click on "Subscribe." You will be notified with a confirmation email.

If you do not want to receive this e-zine, please follow the link at
the very bottom of the issue of GenealogyGems you just received or
send an email to kspears [at] acpl.lib.in.us with "unsubscribe e-zine" in
the subject line.

Curt Witcher, editor pro-tem
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